RSS Feed

Posts Tagged ‘job hunting’

  1. The Job Applicant Hierarchy – Who Really Gets the Job? [by Marc Shaeffer]

    August 9, 2014 by Lady Unemployed

    who really gets the job?

     

    Overall, the job market is getting better.   Slowly getting better, that is.  Personally, I’ve been having more job interviews in the last 6 months than anytime time period since I was let go from my full-time job in 2010.   Last Friday, there were signs that more discouraged workers that were once sitting on the sidelines were now re-entering the workforce.   The competition for jobs, however, is still a concern.   As of May, there is still an average of more than 2 unemployed people per 1 open position.   If you factor in people with jobs, career fields and regional markets, that number is actually higher.   With more people entering the workforce, that ratio may not fluctuate much in the coming months.

    Anyone who’s been out of his or her career field for a long time knows how competitive the job market has been.   When you apply for an open position at a company, there’s always a hierarchy of candidates that hiring mangers have to consider:

    1. Internal candidates with similar experience
    2. External candidates with similar experience who have a job.
    3. External candidates with similar experience who have been out of work less than 3 months.
    4. External candidates with similar experience who have been out of work less than 6 months.
    5. External candidates with similar experience who have been out of work more than 6 months.

    And then somewhere at the bottom near #1000:

    External candidates with no relevant experience who might just be trying to fill a job search quota for unemployment compensation.

    Technically, I’m at #5 in this pecking order.   I’m under-employed, but I have not found any (non-volunteer) work in my career field for over 6 months.   This is something I have come to realize shortly after the completion of even the most successful interviews.   Recently, I interviewed for a full-time position at a media company involved with theatrical program distribution.   I got my interview suit dry-cleaned.   Went to the barber for a trim (and to de-emphasize my gray hair).   Did all my research regarding the company.   Prepared all kinds of questions I might be asked.   Come time for the interview, I was ready.   Spoke with confidence with the hiring manager.   After it was over, I felt I had a very good shot at the next round of interviews.

    A week later, I got an email on a Friday afternoon from the hiring manager.   He thanked me personally for coming in to talk and that I had “great qualities and a professional attitude” but he added, however, that “we will be going in a different direction and will not need your services at this time.” When I asked a follow-up question regarding what key characteristic the other favored candidates had that I may have been lacking, his reply included this cryptic sentence:

    There are a set of individuals with similar attributes and experiences similar to yours that are currently more ingrained in our industry that make for a better fit.”

    In others words, I was being passed over because I wasn’t a #1 or #2 on the Job Applicant Hierarchy.   Even in this slow job recovery, being a #5 sometimes feels like being all the way down to number #1000.   The only way to improve your chances is stronger job growth or maybe finding a new career path altogether.   I’m at a point where I may have to choose the latter option.

    We’ll see.       

    What do you think of the job hierarchy? Who really gets the job you are interviewing for? 

    You can read more about Marc Shaeffer and is job searching journey by visiting his blog at http://laboringtowork.weebly.com.


  2. Job Hunting is Expensive by Ed Tsyitee Jr. (Twitter @GreenChileAdict)

    May 21, 2014 by Lady Unemployed

    I couldn’t wait to post this, because this expresses a tragic truth of the job search. It’s expensive and you are dug into a hole very difficult to get out of. Thank you to guest writer and fellow Twitter peep, Ed Tsyitee Jr. @GreenChileAdict.

    job hunting is expensive
    Here is the cold hard truth that career advisers and coaches will never tell you-job hunting is expensive.

    I’m tired of hearing of all the free services that’s available to you when you job hunt. Non-profits that offer resume writing, or free career counseling services at the local Workforce Solutions Center (the unemployment office). I know that.

    But, job hunting is expensive.

    While I sit here-unemployed-looking for a job, scouring the internet, reading my e-mail alerts, doing research on companies, my bills are piling up.

    Rent is past due. Hello eviction notice.

    Utilities are past due.

    Cable/internet is off. Not that big of a deal-there is the library with their open unsecured internet service.

    What about professional clothes for interviews? Have you ever shopped thrift stores for interview clothes that didn’t scream “Boogie Nights”?

    Here’s the worst of it. The phone is off. There is no way to contact me other than e-mail.

    Sure, I can apply for a survival job. Bring in money. But guess what? That takes at least 30 days from date of hire to first paycheck. Should I suspend the job search for 30 days? What if there is THE job I’ve been looking for?

    Yeah, job hunting is expensive.

    And when things get expensive, you stop doing them.

    No wonder so many people give up looking and take whatever is available.


  3. Do Job Ad Physical Requirements Need to be This Specific?

    March 22, 2014 by Lady Unemployed

    So I’ve been job hunting lately and I’m used to the usual “physical requirements” for job listings. Most of them say things like “must be able to sit or stand for lengthy periods of time” or “lift 20 lbs” or something along those lines.

    But today I found the most ridiculous list of job physical requirements that I’ve ever seen in my life. Although I know sight is necessary, I’ve never seen it described in such a way:

    Adjustment of lens of eye to bring an object into sharp focus. This item is especially important when doing near-point work at varying distances from eye.

    As a woman with horrid vision, let’s hope they are okay with glasses. Oh, and it doesn’t stop there.  Oh, and in case you were wondering, the fingers are an extension of the hand. See? They even clarify it for you.

    Seizing, holding, grasping, turning, or otherwise working with hands. Fingers are involved only to the extent that they are an extension of the hand.

    Picking, pinching, or otherwise working with fingers primarily (rather than with whole hand or arm as in handling).

    Pinching? Really? Sounds like a lawsuit waiting to happen.

    And then here’s where it gets even weirder –

    Expressing or exchanging ideas by means of the spoken word. Talking is important for those activities in which workers must impart oral information to clients or to the public, and in those activities in which they must convey detailed or important spoken instructions to other workers accurately, loudly, or quickly.

    Really, talking is important? If it were up to me, I’d never talk to my coworkers.  Or the public. Just me and my bubble.

    Perceiving the nature of sounds. Hearing is important for those activities which require ability to receive detailed information through oral communication, and to make fine discriminations in sound, such as when making fine adjustments on running engines.

    I’ve never seen a job posting define what hearing is and isn’t this a lovely, roundabout, way of them asking for someone who doesn’t have any disabilities?

    And if they need to be this specific, who did they hire before? And who the hell wrote this ad?